Understanding Credit Scores – Easier For Lenders to Deal With

A good way to figure out understanding credit scores is to think about having to weed through thousands of credit reports every day like most credit vendors have to. You would like to have something that makes it easier, so you don’t have to spend all that time coming up with your own assessment of each individual credit report.

That is what a credit score is. It is a summation by FICO of what your creditworthiness is based on your credit history. It makes it easier for lenders to make expedient decisions.

In understanding credit scores you must first realize that a credit report is a laundry list of your credit history over your entire list. Any given credit report can be fairly tedious to plow through and quantify. Everyone wants fast credit decisions. The credit applicant wants a fast decision so they can get on with their purchase. The lender wants a fast decision so they can grow their business.

Having to come up with their own individual summations based on the full credit report of an applicant can be a lot of work and delay a decision. That’s not good for the lender because like any business they need to be competitive. Borrowers will be more likely to do business with someone who can make a quick decision.

Understanding credit scores and how they are used can be a great tool in figuring out your financial future.

If you keep a diligent eye on your credit score and continually work to keep it high, you can take advantage of the great prices out there right now on everything from houses and cars to home improvements and other consumer items. Times are tough, but if you have a good credit score you can really do well for yourself and take advantage of your good credit score.

Understanding credit scores and how lenders look at them can give anyone an advantage when making credit deals. The thing to keep in mind is that credit scores are a short cut for lenders to make decisions on how creditworthy you are. To keep your credit scores up you can take some easy steps such as paying bills on time, using prepaid credit cards and trying to consolidate all your outstanding debt into one bill. All of these actions can help raise your credit score so you can take advantage of credit deals . . .… Read More

Making Dough, Splashing Spondulicks and Wasting Wonga

With the exception of sex, drink and food there are more slang words for money in the English language than for any other thing.

Perhaps due to being the UK’s financial centre since commerce began, most of the slang terms for money originated in London.

In the old East End of London, cockney rhyming slang produced some of the most creative terms and phrases for money. Bees (bees and honey), lolly, readies, folding, wonga and hundreds more terms have emerged from Bow to Wapping and Bethnal Green to Whitechapel over the centuries.

The popularity of different terms comes and goes, new variations crop up and older ones are revived with bewildering regularity.

Back in the 1970s you could ask someone to lend you “a lady” without out it being construed as an illicit request. In the decade that gave us glam rock and punk rock “a lady” meant 5 (Lady Godiva – fiver).

For cockneys and mockneys in the 1990s, if something cost “a bag” it was 1000 (bag of sand – grand). More recently, in gambling circles, “a biscuit” has come to mean 1000. This is not exactly rhyming slang, it’s referring to the size of larger casino chips – which look like biscuits.

Borrowing a pony to boost your macaroni

To confuse things further, over time, slang terms for money begin to refer to other slang terms rather than to an actual thing. In the last 5 years it has become popular to use “macaroni” to mean 25. There is no direct connection between “macaroni” and 25, but it does rhyme with pony…

“A pony” has been used to mean 25 since the 18th century and is still popular today. However, theories about the origins of its use are hotly contested.

Some say 25 was the price of a small horse in the 1700s, others argue it’s because there was a picture of a horse on an Indian 25 rupee note at the time. There are even those that trace it back to biblical stories – far too convoluted to go into here.

Whatever the origin, it keeps on changing and maybe one day in the future etymologists will be arguing over why people in early 21st century used “macaroni” to mean 25 – I’m going to get my theory in early and say, given the current rate of inflation, it was the price of a packet of pasta in 2012.

Wonga, wadge and moola

Immigration and travel has had an impact on the words we use for money. Yiddish speaking immigrants from Russia and Germany in the late 1900s and early 20 century had a huge impact on the English language.

It was common to hear many Londoners refer to their money as shekels right up until the early 1960s.

Moola/moolah is as popular today as it was in the 1930s. “Moola” comes from the word matzah, a type of bread. Dough and bread have been used as terms for money for many years.

Wonga … Read More